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Friday 5 April 2019

Do you want to divest from fossil fuels ? This publication will help you!

The guidebook contains a collection of case studies, best practices and tools that can help local governments align their spending and investments with the Paris Agreement objective of limiting global warming well below 2°C, by fully integrating energy and climate issues into their budgetary and financial planning.

"Taking from a fossil fuel economy to reinvest in local sustainable communities"


The importance of sub-national governments in achieving international and European climate goals in line with the 2015 Paris Agreement has been highlighted countless times, showing that “over a third of the EU’s 2020 emission reduction target will be delivered by cities”, to give just one example.
But despite the high degree of awareness regarding their role in meeting the environmental challenges among local authorities themselves, the responsibility for achieving their energy and climate targets still lies overwhelmingly on the shoulders of the Energy and Climate Departments of the cities’ administrations. Other departments and agencies, including the Financial Departments and City Treasuries, often do not feel concerned or do not see how they can contribute to attaining climate goals.

How can local authorities align their finances with a 2°C scenario?

Our Green Robin Hood gives use the keys to success by describing a multitude of strategies and tools, that cities and towns of various sizes are testing.
Discover these strategies around five main axes:

  • Environmental reporting and budgeting
  • Green public procurement
  • Fossil fuel divestment of municipal funds
  • Green municipal bonds
  • Earmarking local revenues and other financial instruments.

Some examples you will find in the full-text publication "Climate-mainstreaming municipal budgets"

Greater London Authority
In its London Environment Strategy drafted in 2017, the Greater London Authority under Mayor Sadiq Khan proposes the introduction of three five-year carbon budgets from 2018 to 2032, determining the city’s emissions pathway to zero carbon by 2050. Different to the carbon budget for Manchester, London’s carbon budgets are aligned with the legislated carbon budgets of the United Kingdom, although the details of the methodology are less clear.

City of Barcelona
Is the Spanish forerunner in Green Public Procurement (GPP). It is a perfect example of how GPP can be gradually implemented, while focusing on capacity building and a high degree of cooperation between city staff.

City of Münster
As the forerunner of the municipal divestment movement in Germany since its decision to divest in 2015, the city has been very transparent about its divestment strategy and process. More recently, the city’s divestment has also been a factor earning Münster the distinction as ‘Germany’s most sustainable major city 2019’ from the German Sustainability Award under the patronage of the Federal President.

City of Paris
Since its first green bond issue in 2015, Paris has had the ambition of becoming a world leader in terms of green finance and has also shown an interest in mentoring other cities about its green bond experiences through peer mentoring in the context of the PROSPECT project (Horizon 2020 funding).

City of Lausanne
Through the municipal utility company, Lausanne has been able to set up two funds financ-ing energy and climate-related campaigns on the basis of a small tax on citizens’ electricity consumption. The fund for energy efficiency has allowed a holistic programme of advice and incentives for households and businesses to be set up, reducing energy use in the territory.

Climate-mainstreaming municipal budgets Climate-mainstreaming municipal budgets

January 2019
"Taking from a fossil fuel economy to reinvest in local sustainable communities"
The importance of sub-national governments in achieving international and European climate goals in line with the 2015 Paris Agreement has been highlighted countless times, showing that “over a third of the EU’s 2020 emission reduction target will be delivered by cities”1, to give just one example. But despite the high degree of awareness regarding their role in meeting the environmental challenges among local authorities themselves, the responsibility for achieving their energy and climate targets still lies overwhelmingly on the shoulders of the Energy and Climate Departments of the cities’ administrations.



Download: PDF - 7 Mb



by Béatrice Karas on 5 April 2019 / 365 visits




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